Erik the Flutemaker – Selling Flutes, Bamboo Flutes, Pennywhistles, Bamboo Saxes and Side-Blown Flutes

FlutesFlutes go way back. You can find in Genisis 4:21 that Jubal was the father of the harp and the pipe (`uwgab) translated at times as a flute, reed-pipe, or panpipes.Starting out? The secret to flute playing is not to try hard. But to relax into it. When we try too hard we can become a master of repeated mistakes. On the side-blown flute, forget the fingers for a bit and start holding the flute around the mouthpiece. Press the flute against your lower relaxed grin, roll the flute a bit and spit watermelon seeds across the hole to get sound. Press and roll to find the sweet spot for best sound. Blow across the mouthpiece not into it. Don’t pucker, it will make you dizzy. You can look in mirror to make sure you have a grin-line not a hole from a pucker.

Źródło: Erik the Flutemaker – Selling Flutes, Bamboo Flutes, Pennywhistles, Bamboo Saxes and Side-Blown Flutes

Need some help?

Na stronie Tony Dixon Music (producent whistle) pojawił się przystępny „tutorial” dla początkujących w grze na tym instrumencie:

If you’ve bought a high D whistle, and find it a bit loud or shrill, there are other keys available. (The fact that I make whistles and flutes has nothing to do with the last statement). The larger the whistle, the deeper it is, and it usually follows that the holes will be larger and more widely spaced, which may make things a bit awkward for the complete newcomer.

Źródło: Tony Dixon Music – Need some help?

Początkującym polecam 🙂

Ethnicwind i średniowiecza improwizacja

W kwietniu tego roku, po prawie rocznym błąkaniu się sam nie wiem gdzie, dotarł do mnie w końcu piękny i pięknie brzmiący whistle:

tin whistle (konstrukcja Nick Metcalf, ethnicwind.com)

tin whistle (konstrukcja Nick Metcalf, ethnicwind.com)

a teraz w końcu zebrałem się by zaprezentować jego surowe brzmienie czyli mojwe jutubowe selfi dla Was: